Healthcare News

Work stress doubles heart disease risk in men; essential heart care tips | Health

[ad_1]

Work stress can play havoc with men’s heart health especially when the stressful working conditions are not matched with suitable compensation, says a new study published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. The study noted that the impact of work stress on women is inconclusive. The study was done on 6,500 white-collar workers in Canada, with an average age of 45. (Also read: World Heart Day 2023: Early warning signs of heart attack women may experience weeks before)

Work stress can also lead to plaque build-up and increase in blood pressure which in turn can affect heart. Mindfulness, exercise, meditation, stress relieving activities can help keep heart issues due to stress at bay.(Freepik)
Work stress can also lead to plaque build-up and increase in blood pressure which in turn can affect heart. Mindfulness, exercise, meditation, stress relieving activities can help keep heart issues due to stress at bay.(Freepik)

The authors noted that “the impact of job strain and effort-reward imbalance combined was similar to the magnitude of the impact of obesity on the risk of coronary heart disease.”

Work stress can also lead to plaque build-up and increase in blood pressure which in turn can affect heart. Mindfulness, exercise, meditation, stress relieving activities can help keep heart issues due to stress at bay.

Why men are more vulnerable to work stress

“Men might be more vulnerable to some kinds of work-related stress, which may in some situations increase the risk of heart issues. It’s important to remember that everyone reacts to stress differently, and that other elements like genetics, lifestyle, and general health have a big impact on heart health,” says Dr. Subhendu Mohanty, Head Cardiologists from Sharda Hospital.

“Men and women commonly operate in environments and professions that are distinct from one another. In some select industries with high levels of stress, such as those in finance, police enforcement, etc, men may be more at risk for chronic stress in these industries due to the demands of the job or the culture of the company,” adds Dr Mohanty.

“Chronic work-related stress can significantly elevate the risk of heart disease, with men being particularly vulnerable. This phenomenon is deeply concerning from a medical standpoint. Prolonged exposure to stress triggers a cascade of physiological responses that lead to hypertension, inflammation, and an increased propensity for cardiovascular issues. It’s crucial for individuals, especially men, to recognize the importance of managing stress through lifestyle changes, exercise, and seeking support, “ says Dr. Puneet Varma, Consultant – Cardiology – Adult, Narayana Health City Bangalore.

“The link between work-related stress and its adverse impact on health has become increasingly evident, and a recent study highlighting the potential doubling of heart disease risk in men underscores the urgency of addressing this issue. This research sheds light on a concerning correlation that warrants serious attention from both individuals and organizations,” says Dr Amar Singhal, Senior Consultant, Interventional Cardiologist, Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute.

“Stress, especially chronic stress, can lead to a range of detrimental physiological responses in the body, including elevated blood pressure, inflammation, and unhealthy lifestyle choices like poor diet and lack of exercise. In the context of men’s heart health, these factors can collectively contribute to a higher risk of heart disease,” adds Dr Singhal.

How men can deal with work stress

“Stress at work must be managed. You may be aware of the mental and physical symptoms of stress, which can include tiredness, irritability, headaches, tension in the muscles, and trouble concentrating. Early detection of these symptoms can facilitate intervention. Make sure you get adequate sleep, consume a healthy diet, and exercise frequently. Mental well-being is significantly influenced by physical health. Analyse your stress levels and the success of your coping mechanisms on a regular basis. Adapt your strategy as necessary,” says Dr Mohanty.

“Employers play a pivotal role in mitigating this risk by promoting a healthier work environment. Encouraging breaks, implementing stress-reduction programs, and fostering a culture of work-life balance can significantly benefit employees. Furthermore, individuals must prioritize self-care and recognize the importance of seeking help when feeling overwhelmed,” says Dr Singhal.

Heart healthy measures for men

“Men need to take care of their hearts since they are more likely than women to get heart disease. Still, you should exercise according to a regular schedule. Exercise helps maintain a healthy weight, control blood pressure, and improve cardiovascular health. Consume plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins as part of a heart-healthy diet. The risk of heart disease is decreased by reaching and maintaining a healthy weight. Determine your Body Mass Index (BMI) and strive to maintain it within the advised range. Heart disease risk can be increased by having high cholesterol levels. Get regular cholesterol checks, and, in conjunction with your doctor, maintain your cholesterol levels with diet, exercise, and, if necessary, medication. Attempt to get 7-9 hours of restful sleep each night,” says Dr Mohanty.

“In conclusion, the study’s findings are a stark reminder that work stress is not merely a mental health concern but a substantial threat to physical well-being, particularly in men. Addressing this issue comprehensively requires a joint effort from individuals, employers, and healthcare providers to reduce the burden of heart disease and improve overall health,” says Dr Singhal.

“Exciting news! Hindustan Times is now on WhatsApp Channels Subscribe today by clicking the link and stay updated with the latest news!” Click here!

[ad_2]

Source link